Rehabilitation

DIGNITY works to ensure that torture survivors worldwide have access to professional rehabilitation. 

In Denmark, we run a clinic for traumatized refugees and their families. Internationally, we are working with local partners in a number of countries to facilitate help to traumatized women and men in vulnerable and poor areas. In addition, we also conduct research on the treatment of traumatized victims. Read more about our rehabilitation work on this page.

In Denmark

DIGNITY is approved by the Danish Health Authority (Sundhedsstyrelsen) as a highly specialized national center for the rehabilitation of severely traumatized refugees and their families. The treatment is paid for by the Danish public health service.

DIGNITY’s treatment is interdisciplinary and carried out by physicians, physiotherapists, social workers and psychologists. The clinic works with a group of interpreters with experience and knowledge of our methods.

The team helps torture survivors, other traumatized refugees and their family members in processing physical and psychological trauma and tackle social challenges.

[DIGNITY er endvidere VISO-leverandør på børn, unge og undervisningsområdet.]

When we treat traumatized refugees and their families, we not only work to improve their health. We also work to increase their opportunities to find jobs and live better lives.

The treatment also has a positive effect on the children and their opportunities to thrive in kindergarten, school and leisure activities.

Read more about referral and treatment options here:

Klinik – DIGNITY – Danish Institute Against Torture

Internationally

In DIGNITY’s international programmes we work with the rehabilitation of survivors of violence and torture – for instance in the context of war or flight from persecution. Violence may also occur in prisons, during election campaigns or in intimate personal relations.

Our approach is trauma-informed. We use evidence-based and contextually adapted interventions. We always work with local partners to ensure lasting and sustainable efforts to help the traumatized citizens.

We work at locations characterized by poverty. In such locations, it is often difficult for survivors of violence and torture to gain access to or afford treatment. That’s why we train and support volunteers and local health workers without a background in mental health in providing psychosocial first aid.

We work with information campaigns to provide information about the consequences of violence and torture and the accessibility of treatment. We combine these efforts with active advocacy to ensure better conditions and treatment options for trauma victims. We do this to ensure that far more survivors have access to basic psychosocial help.

We always work to develop and support referral networks so survivors in need of a different or more specialized help can be referred to a relevant treatment.

It is important that our partners, who provide psychosocial help, also have access to the necessary support. We focus on how health workers look after themselves, so that they can continue to provide the important treatment of survivors of violence and torture.

We do this in Uganda, Kenya and in other countries, where we have trained local health workers to provide psychological first aid to persons exposed to intimate partner violence.

In Jordan, we support local physiotherapists and psychologists in the treatment of people with trauma after war, flight, and torture.

In Ukraine, we assist partner organisations documenting torture and other gross violations of human rights in taking care of both torture survivors and their own staff.

International programmes

We work with partners. Together with our partners around the world, we work for social and political change to ensure that all torture survivors have access to help.